My name is don wright and this is my digital scrap book. I hope you enjoy the images as much as I did creating them. All art on this site is copyright don wright, and may not be reproduced without my consent.
If you have any questions regarding my art, I welcome you to contact me at waabaanakwad@gmail.com
If you would like to purchase some art, visit http://www.digidoodle.me


Sunday, 15 November 2009

"Sacred Temagami Trout"

"Sacred Temagami Trout" - copyright © don and sue wright 2009

Sue and I are painting a canvas for my best and oldest freind and his wife. We grew up playing dinky toys in the dirt when we were at the tender age of 3. We are musical brothers and I think that time in the sand pile helped us to speak the language of music to each other. He is a friend who can play, based on emotion and translation vs cold hard notes. Now music is not the only love we share. We are both pretty keen on fishing. We have a number of fishing stories...some true..some not so true,,hahaha. At any rate, when he heard that my wife and I were taking up painting he asked if we would sell one.hahahah, in fishing language he just cast the bait. I said, well I never really thought about it, but I'd gladly make you one for free. Ha.....Hook Set! So I sat down with a fresh canvas and laid out this project I will call "Sacred Temagami Trout"

To the Temagami First Nation, the deep water Trout is sacred. The Trout has always been a sustainer of life, feeding not only the Temagami Anishinabek, but the entire food cycle. The authorities are trying to protect the Temagami Deep water Trout from advancing forces. Large restrictions have now been put in place to help protect this magnificent fish. There are a number of lakes that have extra regulation to protect the Sacred Temagami Trout. Lake Temagami, Lake Obabika, and Emerald Lake where my camp is, are all home to this valuable lake fish. I salute all efforts to protect this fishery for the sake of those who have relied on this ecosystem for 1000's of years and in dedication to future generations.

Waabaanakwad has spoken, and now passes the canvas over to Waabigwan